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Classifying and treating an angiosarcoma

Aug 4, 2017 | Failure to Diagnose

New York patients who have undergone treatment for cancer are at risk for developing angiosarcomas. A sarcoma is a tumor that develops in the soft tissue of the body. An angiosarcoma is a soft tissue tumor that starts growing in the tissue that lines the blood and lymphatic vessels. While this type of sarcoma is rare, it is malignant and can be deadly. It particularly affects the body’s deep tissues, the breast, skin and liver.

AS is extremely aggressive and is known to sometimes recur in the same spot after a person has been treated. This tumor is also often associated with metastasis, meaning it can spread to other parts of the body. Secondary occurrence of takes place in the brain, lungs and liver. A person who has not had cancer before is likely to be diagnosed with primary angiosarcoma. Those who develop another tumor after having had radiation treatment for cancer in the past are said to have secondary AS.

Doctors further classify the disease based on the place where the tumor develops. For example, tumors that develop in the endothelial cells of the heart is called cardiac AS. Similarly, a breast AS is a tumor that usually develops in women who have undergone radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer.

Angiosarcomas can be difficult to diagnose and treat, meaning the mortality rate for the disease is very high. If a doctor or specialist fails to properly diagnose AS in a timely manner, impacting the patient’s chance of survival, the patient’s family could seek compensation for their loved one’s medical bills by filing a medical malpractice lawsuit. to be successful, an attorney will have to demonstrate that the delayed diagnosis constituted a failure by the practitioner to exhibit the required standard of care.