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Children awarded $6.4 million for father’s untimely death

Jun 11, 2012 | Failure to Diagnose

Many people in New York City and beyond suffer heart attacks. However, if a heart attack is caught early on, people have a greater chance of surviving.

Recently, a jury awarded a 38-year-old man’s five children with $6.4 million after doctors failed to diagnose the man with a serious heart condition.

In 2009, the father of five collapsed while playing basketball. He was brought to the hospital with symptoms consistent with a heart attack. However, the man was sent home later that day with Motrin and Azithromycin and told that he had pneumonia.

The man was playing basketball again three months later when he collapsed a second time. It was determined that he had suffered a massive heart attack as a result of a complete arterial blockage. He died in November 2009.

The jury found that two emergency room doctors along with the hospital where the man was brought were negligent and contributed to the 38-year-old’s untimely death.

The man’s children range in age from 3 to 11.

This specific case took place in Pennsylvania. It is one of the state’s largest medical malpractice verdicts in recent years. However, the attorney representing the family said the young children would return any amount of money to have another day with their father.

"These young children lost their dad, and no amount of money can replace him," the attorney said.

People seek medical attention with the assumption that physicians will properly diagnose their condition and treat them appropriately. If people cannot rely on physicians to accurately diagnose them in a timely manner, then who can people turn to?

Source: The Pennsylvania Record, "Phila. Jury renders $6.4 million plaintiffs’ verdict in medical malpractice, wrongful death case," Jon Campisi, June 7, 2012