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Certain medication errors may lead to death

Jan 21, 2013 | Doctor Errors

Prescription medication is used frequently in hospitals in New York City and in others all across the country. For some, a single medication can cure them of their ailment. Therefore, it is important that doctors and nurses give patients the right medication and the right dosage.

Sadly, medication errors happen frequently. A study of thousands of voluntarily reported medication errors from 1999 to 2005 showed that errors that are made in intensive care units are more likely to cause harm to patients. Of the errors that were analyzed, 110 may have contributed to a patient’s death in both intensive care units and non-intensive care units.

Researchers also found that patients and their family members are rarely told when a medication error does occur.

This kind of news is startling. Patients and their family members need to be kept informed in order to make appropriate health care decisions.

Instances of medical malpractice, and specifically medication errors, can be quite serious. When medical professionals are negligent and errors are made, patients can be left with serious complications. Sadly, some patients may even die.

People in New York City rely on medical professionals to provide them with appropriate care and treatment. Those in the medical community need to work hard to prevent errors from happening. When they do occur, patients need to be informed.

No one expects to be the victim of medical malpractice. However, medical mistakes happen all the time. People who suspect they are the victim of a serious medical error may find it beneficial to speak with an experienced attorney to determine whether or not legal action may be appropriate.

Source: Chicago Tribune, "Patients rarely told about medication errors," Andrew M. Seaman, Jan. 11, 2013